Twitter
YouTube
RSS
Facebook
ClickBank1
ClickBank1

Archive for the Transition Zone Category


Preaching In The Transition Zone: Whose Vineyard

SERMON TITLE:  Whose Vineyard? – Texts:  Matthew 21:33-46 I recently heard a story about a college student who discover a way to make a little extra money with his personal computer.  Now when I say that he found a way to make a little extra money using his computer, I mean that quite literally.  He […]

Read More...

Preaching In The Transition Zone: Pioneers or Settlers

SERMON TITLE: Pioneers or Settlers!  – Texts:  Matthew 28:18-20 We’ve all heard stories about the westward expansion of the United States.  Leading the way were the pioneers.  They were the forerunners who preceded all others exploring the uncharted territories. Their ambition was to investigate every valley, climb every mountain, traverse every desert, cross every river, […]

Read More...

Discipleship in “The Transition Zone”

The single most important contribution that Anabaptist ecclesiology can make in a post-modern world is to proclaim that Jesus Christ did not intend for his church to be viewed simply as another human institution.  Anabaptists of the sixteenth century were unimpressed by the vast institution the church had become, insisting that this was a corruption […]

Read More...

Separation from State In “The Transition Zone”

Anabaptism developed at a time when a synthesis had developed between the state and the church.  As we noted in earlier blogs, support for this synthesis was evident not only in Roman Catholic theology, but also in the theology of the Protestant reformers.  The Anabaptists, however, rejected this synthesis and sought to separate themselves from […]

Read More...

Salvation is Social, Political, and Individual in “The Transition Zone”

The thesis of these blogs has been that the contemporary church can develop a meaningful theology of evangelism in a postmodern world (“the transition zone”) by recovering the Anabaptist vision of the church.  Thus far we have defined postmodernism, investigated the roots of the Anabaptist tradition, and examined the major tenets of the Anabaptists’ approach […]

Read More...

A Community of Believers In “The Transition Zone”

In previous blogs under “the transition zone” thread, I have shown that the Anabaptists considered the life of discipleship to be the fundamental aspect of the Christian religion.  Obviously this life of discipleship, as defined by the Anabaptists, could not be lived in isolation.  When the Anabaptists spoke about discipleship, they also spoke to the […]

Read More...

Disciples not Decision

We continue in this series of blogs aimed at examining what it means to do evangelization in this post-modern era (what I am calling “the transition zone”).  It is my conviction that the church of today has much to learn about “doing” Christianity from the Anabaptist tradition.  Earlier post have introduced the basic of Anabaptist […]

Read More...

Evangelism and the Kingdom of God

As we continue this series of blog, seeking a theology of evangelism for “the transition zone,” our next challenge is to consider the goals of the evangelization process?  Earlier we noted that the evangelistic invitation of the Anabaptist tradition is to “turn around—to come back to God—to reorient one’s life according to the rule of […]

Read More...

The Gospel, The WHOLE Gospel, and Nothing But The Gospel

The Essential Elements of the Christian Gospel We are in the process of exploring a theology of evangelism for “the transition zone” – that period of time following modernity, often called “post-modernity.”  If you’ve been following along, you know that I am operating under the conviction that the Anabaptist tradition has a great deal to […]

Read More...

What Is Evangelism? – In The Transition Zone

In previous blogs I described in some detail the Anabaptist vision of the church.  Drawing upon the writing of many in the Anabaptist tradition, I described the church (using the word of Stanley Grenz) as an “eschatological covenant community.”[i]  By this I mean that the church is a special community, standing in covenant, serving as […]

Read More...